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24th Annual ICCA Conference

October 2 - 5, 2016

We invite you to join us for the 24th Annual Research Conference being held in Toronto, Canada. We will bring together hundreds of participants that include researchers, policy makers, criminal justice practitioners, and the formerly justice-involved to recall the achievements of the past and to introduce exciting innovations for the future.                                                                                                              WorkShop Schedule • Participant Registration                      Exhibitor/Sponsor Registration • Student Sponsorship

Save the Date!

Japan cordially invites you to attend the Third World Congress on Probation, where we look forward to welcoming practitioners and academics involved in community-based treatment of offenders from all over the world.

The world's largest forum in its field aims to promote and develop community-based treatment of offenders by sharing practical and academic knowledge, as well as broadening global networks.

Shinagawa Prince Hotel - TOKYO, JAPAN - Find out more!

Journal of Communtiy Corrections

The official journal of the International Community Corrections Association, Journal of Community Corrections (JCC) is the most widely read and widely respected journal of policy, research, and programs for community-based rehabilitation and treatment of offenders. The original “what works” journal of evidence-based interventions, JCC brings readers the best thinking of today’s foremost experts in articles that are written, designed, and edited to stimulate action and achieve results.

View Online • Free with Membership • Advertise in the Journal

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About Community Corrections

The supervision of returning citizens and provision of supportive services to these individuals outside of jail or prison. Community corrections includes parole, probation, residential and employment services, and other support programs.
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Attend a Conference or Forum

ICCA hosts several events throughout the year featuring Federal policy makers, industry thought leaders, and experienced practitioners. In addition to plenary sessions, workshops focus on implementing best practices.
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Call for Papers - ICCA Annual Conference 2016

2nd-Chances

2nd Chances Siting Project

Gathering the collective wisdom of veteran community correction professionals from within its own membership, the International Community Corrections Association has created a Tool Kit for siting new or expanded community corrections programs and facilities.

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A look at News from our Facebook page

 

 


 


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Some federal prisoners being released early this weekend, including in Ohio

COLUMBUS, Ohio (WCMH) — It was the late 1980s and early 1990s, and the drug busts were almost nightly.

The city of Columbus, and the nation, plagued by crack cocaine and laws were stiffened to try to stop it.

Now, 6,000 of those people rounded up in the raids are being released from prison early.

They have spent decades in prison.In recent years, legislators and judges have wondered if keeping them locked up is the right thing to do.

This weekend, thousands are being released to halfway houses to go through the process of job training, dealing with addictions, and everything else that comes with a reintroduction.

There are 99 here in Ohio, and some have already made the move.

"We're talking about low-level, nonviolent drug offenders," said Phil Nunes with Alvis, a series of halfway houses and reintroduction facilities throughout the state.

"Back in the 80s and 90s when crack cocaine was so prevalent, the federal government stepped in. (They took) what would ordinarily be an actual state statue and created a federal legislation statute, so now crack cocaine became not just a state offense it now became a federal offense."

That's why so many of them received stiff sentences.

Letting them out early, if there is no violence in their history, is a way to save money. But Nunes says it's something more.

"It's saving us money as well as getting those people out of an expensive prison bed, but it's also saving human potential because these people can get a chance at getting a restart in their life."

Of course, the drug convictions of the crack era aren't the only offenders.

The average sentence reduction for those who've applied for retroactive sentencing since the amendment is 23 months, lowering the average sentence from 131 months to 108 months, the Justice Department said.

Deputy Attorney General Sally Quillian Yates said they were "modest reductions" for drug offenders, who will have served "substantial prison sentences."

"The Department of Justice strongly supports sentencing reform for low-level, non-violent drug offenders," she said in a statement. "The Sentencing Commission's actions — which create modest reductions for drug offenders — is a step toward these necessary reforms."

Source: Some federal prisoners being released early this weekend, including in Ohio


 

An Interview with Alex Tomaszczuk 

the Winner of Our 2015 Charlie Flowers Award

Alex Tomaszczuk



Alex Tomaszczuk the winner of ICCA's Charlie Flowers Award for 2015 recently sat down for an interview with a representative of ICCA, Dr. Kevin Downey. Alex is a partner at Pillsbury Law Firm who we'd also like to thank for their ongoing hosting of the annual DC Forum board meeting. The following is an excerpt from their conversation.

 

How did you get introduced to ICCA?

 

I was first introduced to ICCA by the President of Dismas Charities, Inc., Mr. Ray Weis, and its CEO, Ms. Jan Kempf. That introduction was, in turn, facilitated by one of the current members of Dismas's Board of Directors, who previously worked for Shaw, Pittman, one of the predecessor firms to Pillsbury (and where I started my legal career in 1982). Since that initial introduction I have had the pleasure of representing various organizations who participate in ICCA, including a few organizations that are represented on ICCA's Board. This work goes back a decade or more -- time flies when you're having fun! I have always been impressed by the significant societal contributions made by ICCA and its member organizations.

 

For what kind of issues might our association members turn to the Pillsbury Law firm?

 

Pillsbury is one of the largest 100 law firms in the United States, with major offices in Washington, D.C., New York, Houston, throughout California, and in several international cities. We try to help our clients – which range from the largest corporations in the world to individuals – solve business problems efficiently and effectively. Having made that plug, there are several key areas where ICCA members might have occasion to call on us. First, if there is a dispute with or challenge to the actions of any governmental body, such as the U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons, including the award of a contract or a failure to award a contract, or a dispute concerning the administration of a contract, we are well-positioned to assist with that effort (this happens to be the work I do as a government contracts litigator). Second, we have a highly-regarded non-profit organizations practice, based in Washington, D.C., which provides advice on tax, Board governance, and leadership transition issues. Third, we have a large litigation practice, a component of which focuses on employment claims and personnel disputes. Another component of our litigation practice is focused on the conduct of internal investigations and responding to Government subpoenas and investigations. We hope ICCA members never have to resolve an employment dispute with a disgruntled employee or respond to a Government investigation, but if that happens we can help. My direct dial phone number is 213-488-7110 (I always try to answer my own phone) or you can email me any time at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

What is your experience in the community corrections field?

 

By and large, my "formal" experience in community corrections has been derived from working with clients that provide halfway house and other types of rehabilitative services. I have had occasion to visit several different facilities operated by clients, and that has always proven to be an enlightening and informative experience. During a post-college fellowship I had the opportunity to study rising incarceration rates and actually tour the federal prison at Leavenworth. On a "pro bono" basis my firm has also represented incarcerated individuals, including one notable death row case. Those experiences explain the great respect I have for the work that ICCA and its members perform on a daily basis.




Government of Canada Announces College Research Funding / New research projects will contribute to stronger, safer, healthier Canadian communities

TORONTO, ONTARIO -- (Marketwired) -- 01/21/16 -- Colleges and polytechnics across Canada are receiving nearly $6 million in federal support through the Community and College Social Innovation Fund (CCSIF) to address a range of social issues, including poverty, community safety and local economic development.

Minister of Science Kirsty Duncan today announced funding for 27 research projects, alongside James Maloney, Member of Parliament for Etobicoke - Lakeshore.

Today's event featured the project of Humber College's Jeanine Webber. Her two-year impact study is receiving nearly $200,000 to examine the Toronto Police Service's Neighbourhood Officer Program-which assigned neighbourhood officers to 17 selected neighbourhoods to increase police presence and address community problems. Dr. Webber and her team will partner with the Toronto Police Service as part of the study, which promotes public confidence through the scientific evaluation of a police program, while also engaging a greater number of community residents in the evaluation process.Government of Canada Announces College Research Funding / New research projects will contribute to stronger, safer, healthier Canadian communities

TORONTO, ONTARIO -- (Marketwired) -- 01/21/16 -- Colleges and polytechnics across Canada are receiving nearly $6 million in federal support through the Community and College Social Innovation Fund (CCSIF) to address a range of social issues, including poverty, community safety and local economic development.

Minister of Science Kirsty Duncan today announced funding for 27 research projects, alongside James Maloney, Member of Parliament for Etobicoke - Lakeshore.

Today's event featured the project of Humber College's Jeanine Webber. Her two-year impact study is receiving nearly $200,000 to examine the Toronto Police Service's Neighbourhood Officer Program-which assigned neighbourhood officers to 17 selected neighbourhoods to increase police presence and address community problems. Dr. Webber and her team will partner with the Toronto Police Service as part of the study, which promotes public confidence through the scientific evaluation of a police program, while also engaging a greater number of community residents in the evaluation process.

Read more...

 



ICCA's 2016 Annual Conference will be held in Toronto, Canada and what a coincidence The New York Times voted it #7 out of 52 places to visit in 2016! Now you really gotta go!

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Canada's largest city is ready for its close-up.

Toronto is remaking itself as Canada's premier city, quietly slipping out of the shadow of Montreal and Vancouver. Last year, the Queens Quay on Lake Ontario reopened, part of the largest continuing urban revitalization project in North America. It now has bike and pedestrian paths and new streetcars that link green spaces and promenades that will be full of public art. The Junction, a former industrial area, has emerged as Toronto's most stylish neighborhood for its bars, live music and coffee shops. And the city is becoming easier to visit: a train now whisks travelers downtown from the airport in 25 minutes, and Air Canada offers extended stopovers for connecting passengers. Toronto has long been known for its cultural diversity and continues to draw major artistic and sporting events, including the Toronto International Film Festival each September, and the 2016 N.B.A. All-Star game, held outside the United States for the first time.

More Here: http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/01/07/travel/places-to-visit.html?place=toronto

 


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A TV news article with ICCA Past President Phil Nunes

Watch it here


Some federal prisoners being released early this weekend, including in Ohio

By Mike Bowersock 

 

5Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)5 Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window) 131Share on Facebook (Opens in new window)131 Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)

 COLUMBUS, Ohio (WCMH) — It was the late 1980s and early 1990s, and the drug busts were almost nightly.

 The city of Columbus, and the nation, plagued by crack cocaine and laws were stiffened to try to stop it.

 Now, 6,000 of those people rounded up in the raids are being released from prison early.

 They have spent decades in prison.

 In recent years, legislators and judges have wondered if keeping them locked up is the right thing to do.

 This weekend, thousands are being released to halfway houses to go through the process of job training, dealing with addictions, and everything else that comes with a reintroduction.

 There are 99 here in Ohio, and some have already made the move.

 "We're talking about low-level, nonviolent drug offenders," said Phil Nunes with Alvis, a series of halfway houses and reintroduction facilities throughout the state.

 "Back in the 80s and 90s when crack cocaine was so prevalent, the federal government stepped in. (They took) what would ordinarily be an actual state statue and created a federal legislation statute, so now crack cocaine became not just a state offense it now became a federal offense."

 That's why so many of them received stiff sentences.

 Letting them out early, if there is no violence in their history, is a way to save money. But Nunes says it's something more.

 "It's saving us money as well as getting those people out of an expensive prison bed, but it's also saving human potential because these people can get a chance at getting a restart in their life."

 Of course, the drug convictions of the crack era aren't the only offenders.

 The average sentence reduction for those who've applied for retroactive sentencing since the amendment is 23 months, lowering the average sentence from 131 months to 108 months, the Justice Department said.

 Deputy Attorney General Sally Quillian Yates said they were "modest reductions" for drug offenders, who will have served "substantial prison sentences."

 "The Department of Justice strongly supports sentencing reform for low-level, non-violent drug offenders," she said in a statement. "The Sentencing Commission's actions — which create modest reductions for drug offenders — is a step toward these necessary reforms."

 

 


 

Japan to Host the Third World Congress on Probation!

 

 

 


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Siting Project

2NDChancesLogoA toolkit to help you build stakeholder support for siting community corrections programs and facilities to be featured at the 19th Annual "Doing What Works" Conference.