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DC Public Policy Forum & Hill Day 2015

Please join ICCA when we host our Community Corrections Public Policy Forum in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday March 3 and Wednesday March 4, 2015

This forum will feature criminal justice leaders from the Private & Public sectors in order to highlight current trends, pending legislation and relevant updates for those working within community corrections.

Registration Now Open!

ICCA 23rd Annual Conference

 

The International Community Corrections Association invites you to attend the 23rd Annual Conference in Boston, Massachusetts November 8 - 10, 2015

Share in learning effective practices for juveniles, adults and organizations.


2nd World Congress

 

American Probation and Parole Association (APPA), in partnership with International Community Corrections Association (ICCA), are co-hosting the World Congress on Community Corrections, at the Westin Bonaventure Hotel & Suites in Los Angeles, California, USA, on July 14-16, 2015.

Register Here!

Journal of Communtiy Corrections

The official journal of the International Community Corrections Association, Journal of Community Corrections (JCC) is the most widely read and widely respected journal of policy, research, and programs for community-based rehabilitation and treatment of offenders. The original “what works” journal of evidence-based interventions, JCC brings readers the best thinking of today’s foremost experts in articles that are written, designed, and edited to stimulate action and achieve results.

 Get Online Access | Advertise in the Journal

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About Community Corrections

The supervision of returning citizens and provision of supportive services to these individuals outside of jail or prison. Community corrections includes parole, probation, residential and employment services, and other support programs.
Learn more...

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Attend a Conference or Forum

ICCA hosts several events throughout the year featuring Federal policy makers, industry thought leaders, and experienced practitioners. In addition to plenary sessions, workshops focus on implementing best practices.
Learn more... 

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2nd Chances Siting Project

Gathering the collective wisdom of veteran community correction professionals from within its own membership, the International Community Corrections Association has created a Tool Kit for siting new or expanded community corrections programs and facilities.

 

 

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Christine M. Cole has been appointed as the Executive Director of the Crime and 

Justice Institute at Community Resources for Justice. Headquartered in Boston, MA, with additional offices and contracts around the nation, the Crime and Justice Institute (CJI) works to make criminal and juvenile justice systems more efficient, promoting accountability while achieving better outcomes.


 

"We are thrilled that Christine will be joining our staff," said Scott Harshbarger, chair of the CRJ board of directors. "Her experience across many disciplines, combined with her national and international network of professional contacts, will be important as we move our work at CJI to the next level."

     More details here.


 CJCJ

PRETRIAL SERVICES: AN EFFECTIVE ALTERNATIVE TO MONETARY BAIL

California's Public Safety Realignment Act, which shifted the responsibility of adults convicted of low-level offences from the state to the counties, was intended to encourage counties to employ innovative and effective alternatives to incarceration. Many California counties, however, have continued to rely heavily on incarceration, pushing their jails to capacity. In an attempt to reduce jail overcrowding, attention is turning to the 63 percent of people held in county jails who have not been convicted of a crime. Many of these people are waiting for their day in court in jail - not because they pose a risk to public safety, but simply because they cannot afford to post bail.

Read the full document here.



 

 CCCN

CCCN's next meeting is scheduled for March 4-5, 2015 in Washington, D.C.

The Community Corrections Collaborative Network (CCCN) will meet in Washington, D.C. on March 4-5, 2015. Network members will be in town to support the International Community Corrections Association’s D.C. day, which is scheduled for Tuesday, March 3, 2015. The CCCN will take part in a panel discussion on community corrections. Following ICCA’s D.C. day, at the network meeting, the CCCN will host a roundtable discussion with both national experts and our local federal partners on the Affordable Care Act and Community Corrections. This discussion will help shape our network’s goals to leverage the opportunities the ACA provides.

CCCN’s 2014 brief titled “Key Opportunities to Advance Safe and Smart Community Corrections Policies”

“The Affordable Care Act provides a significant opportunity to help the field reduce the use of incarceration and meet individuals’ needs outside the criminal justice system. Under the health care reform expansion, up to 15 million previously uninsured low income adults will be eligible for health care coverage. This change alone creates the opportunity to support the drug treatment, mental health and associated needs of millions of individuals before they end up more entrenched in the criminal justice system. We can accomplish this through diversion and drug courts, and pay for the treatment of individuals leaving correctional facilities, and those who are currently on probation, parole and pretrial supervision status.”

You can access a copy of the CCCN’s brief at: http://static.nicic.gov/UserShared/2014-07-29_cccn_brief_from_spring_meeting_7__25_14.pdf

The Community Corrections Collaborative Network (CCCN) is comprised of the leading associations nowrepresenting nearly 90,000-plus probation, parole, pretrial, and treatment professionals around the country, including the American Probation and Parole Association (APPA), the Association of Paroling Authorities International (APAI), the Federal Probation and Pretrial Officers Association (FPPOA), the International Community Corrections Association (ICCA), the National Association of Drug Court Professionals (NADCP), the National Association of Pretrial Services Agencies (NAPSA), and the National Association of Probation Executives (NAPE).

This is the first time in community corrections, that the leading associations have come together to speak with one voice. The CCCN is highly committed to making a difference in community corrections.

View our newly revised position paper, “Safe and Smart Ways to Solve America’s Correctional Challenges”, here:http://community.nicic.gov/wikis/cccn/cccn-s-position-paper-safe-and-smart-ways-to-solve-america-s-correctional-challenges.aspx

Additional CCCN resources:

Community Corrections Collaborative Network, Radio Show 223, Greg Crawford, CPS at NIC, and Network Manager for the CCCN, along with Spurgeon Kennedy, Vice President of the National Association of Pretrial Services Agencies, and Phil Nunes, President of the International Community Corrections Association:http://media.csosa.gov/podcast/audio/2014/09/community-corrections-collaborative-network-national-institute-corrections/

 "A National Consensus on Community Corrections-National Institute of Corrections" Radio Show 196, Greg Crawford, CPS at NIC, and Network Manager for CCCN along with Spurgeon Kennedy, Vice President of the National Association of Pretrial Services.

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact Greg Crawford, Network Manager, and Correctional Program Specialist at NIC at:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  or 202-514-4273.

 

 


 


CCCN


Correctional Populations in the United States, 2013
Lauren E. Glaze, Danielle Kaeble
 
Just released 12/19/14

Presents statistics on offenders supervised by adult correctional systems in the United States at yearend 2013, including offenders supervised in the community on probation or parole and those incarcerated in prison or local jail. The report provides the size and change in the total correctional population during 2013. It details the slowing rate of decline in the population since 2010 and the downward trend in the correctional supervision rate since 2007. It also examines the impact of changes in the community supervision and incarcerated populations on the total correctional population in recent years. Findings cover the size of the male and female correctional populations and compare the rates of change in the populations by correctional status since 2000. Appendix tables provide information on other correctional populations, including prisoners under military jurisdiction, inmates held by correctional authorities in the U.S. territories and commonwealths, and jail inmates held in Indian country facilities, and estimates of the total correctional population by jurisdiction and correctional status. Findings are based on data from several BJS correctional data collections.
 

Highlights:
  • An estimated 6,899,000 persons were under the supervision of adult correctional systems at yearend 2013, a decline of about 41,500 from yearend 2012.
  • The decline in the correctional population during 2013 (0.6%) was less than 1% for the second consecutive year, down from 2.1% in 2010 when the fastest annual decline in the population was observed.
  • For the second consecutive year, the community supervision (down 0.6%) and incarcerated (down 0.5%) populations declined by less than 1%.
  • All of the decline in the correctional population during 2013 resulted from decreases in the probation (down 32,100) and local jail (down 13,300) populations.
  • About 1 in 35 adults (2.8%) in the United States was under some form of correctional supervision at yearend 2013, unchanged from 2012.
  • About 1 in 51 adults was on probation or parole at yearend 2013, compared to 1 in 110 adults incarcerated in prison or local jail.

 

 


 

 

ICCA-Statement-on-Ferguson

 


 

Save-the-DC-2015-small

Please join ICCA when we host our Community Corrections Public Policy Forum in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday March 3, 2015

This forum will feature criminal justice leaders from the Private & Public sectors in order to highlight current trends, pending legislation and relevant updates for those working within community corrections.

Registration Now Open!

 


 

2nd-World-Congress

American Probation and Parole Association (APPA), in partnership with International Community Corrections Association (ICCA), are co-hosting the World Congress on Community Corrections, at the Westin Bonaventure Hotel & Suites in Los Angeles, California, USA, on July 14-16, 2015.

Register Here!


 


 

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The International Community Corrections Association invites you to attend the 23rd Annual Conference in Boston, Massachusetts November 8 - 10, 2015

Share in learning effective practices for juveniles, adults and organizations.



 

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Items of interest from the final FY15 bill:

  • Byrne Competitive grants are eliminated.  Funded at $14 million last year, these grants are used for promising practices and for national initiatives to improve the criminal justice system.  
  • Criminal history grants will increase to $73 million, up from $59 million in FY14.  This account combines funding for the National Criminal History Improvement Program (NCHIP) and the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS), of which $25 million is for grants to improve records in NICS, particularly mental health records.
  • Rape kit backlog reduction receives $41 million for a new competitive grant program.  The funding is to support “multi-disciplinary community response teams,” a model that will be developed by NIJ and that will include planning, implementation and long-term evaluation.
  • Anti-heroin efforts receive $7 million for a new competitive grant program to state law enforcement agencies in states with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids.  
  • Regional anti-gang task forces receive $7 million for a new grant program.
  • Prescription drug monitoring will increase to $11 million, up from $7 million in FY14.
  • Juvenile justice state formula grants will increase slightly to $56 million, up from $55 million in FY14.
  • COPS grants are level-funded at $180 million, although funding for hiring will drop to $134.5 million after carve-outs, down from $151 million in FY14.
  • The comprehensive school safety initiative is again funded at $75 million.  This money is for research and grants.
  • Justice Reinvestment Initiative is level-funded at $28 million.
  • Reimbursement to states and local governments under the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program is up slightly to $185 million, up from $180 million in FY14.
  • Residential Substance Abuse Treatment grants are level-funded at $10 million.
  • Debbie Smith and other DNA-related grant programs are level-funded at $125 million.
  • Office on Violence Against Women STOP formula grants are up slightly to $195 million, up from $193 million in FY14.
  • OJP’s diagnostic center and state help desk are zero-funded.

 


 

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House appropriators released  the fiscal 2015 Omnibus Appropriations bill, which provides complete funding for 11 of the 12 appropriations bills through Sept. 30, 2015 (Homeland Security will be funded by a CR through Feb. 27). The House is planning to vote as early as Thursday on the measure, which would then go to the Senate. Current government funding runs out on Dec. 11. Lawmakers may need to move a very short-term continuing resolution to avoid a government shutdown.

 

Second Chance Act

FY15  $68m  

Smart probation: $6m

Children of Incarcerated Parents: $5m

Pay for Success: $7.5m

FY14  $67.7m

 

MIOTCRA

FY15 $8.5m 

FY14 $8.2m

 

Justice Reinvestment

FY15 $27.5m

Colson Task Force:$750, 000

FY14 $27.5m


Reginald B. Darby

Senior Policy Analyst, Government Affairs

Council of State Governments Justice Center

 

 


 

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Recently, legislation was introduced to improve the Second Chance Act passed out of the Senate Judiciary Committee with bipartisan support. The Second Chance Act supports state and local reentry programs to reduce recidivism. 

Rather than incarcerating repeat offenders in the same communities' generation after generation, we can put our taxpayer dollars to better use to break this vicious cycle and turn lives around. The ultimate goal of our criminal justice system is to make our families stronger and our communities safer. The work done under the Second Chance Act helps accomplish that goal, one life at a time, and we are one step closer to its passage.

 

An outline of the Second Chance Reauthorization Act of 2013 can be found HERE.  A sectional analysis of the bill is available HERE, and text of legislation can be found HERE. 

 


 

CCCN

DC Public Safety Radio features the Community Corrections Collaborative Network

As ICCA President, Phil Nunes sits on the National Institute for Corrections Community Corrections Collaborative Committee and last week when in DC he participated in a radio show on DC Public Safety Radio.


Click Here to Listen
Or Here to find out more about the show.

 


 

 

PREA-logoRGB-72dpiUpdate: National PREA Resource Center

International Community Corrections Association

The Field-Initiated arm of the National PREA Resource Center (PRC) continues to be very busy fielding requests for assistance as well as answering questions from the field.

   

The PRC has an ongoing commitment to providing PREA implementation assistance both prior to an audit or following for corrective action plan implementation. The array of assistance is quite large, from standards questions and resource identification, to policy and procedure revisions and targeted on-site assistance such as training that focuses on gaps identified in the audit. The PRC encourages you to reach out with questions and requests for assistance related to the standards.

 

For questions about the standards or resource identification, including archived webinars or publications, please complete the form found at this link: http://www.prearesourcecenter.org/about/contact-us

 

 

To request targeted assistance, please complete the form found at this link: http://www.prearesourcecenter.org/training-technical-assistance/request-for-assistance




 

Risk Assessment Instruments Validated and Implemented in Correctional Settings in the United States: An Empirical Guide

INTRODUCTION

     The rates of crime, incarceration, and correctional supervision are disproportionately high in the U.S. and translate into exorbitant costs to individuals, the public, and the state. Within three years of release from jail or prison, twoSthirds of offenders are rearrested and half are incarcerated for a new crime or parole violation. Though many offenders recidivate, a considerable proportion do not. Thus, there is a need to identify those offenders at greater risk of recidivism and to allocate resources and target risk management and rehabilitation efforts accordingly. Risk assessment, a crucial component to implementing evidenceSbased recidivism reduction strategies, is the process of estimating the likelihood an offender will recidivate by identifying those offenders at higher risk and in greater need of interventions. Assessment results, based on ratings of empirically or theoretically based risk and/or protective factors, can be used to determine intervention targets, appropriate programming level and intensity, and supervision level. There is overwhelming evidence to suggest that assessments of risk completed using structured approaches produce estimates that are both more accurate and more consistent across assessors compared to subjective or unstructured approaches. More and more, structured risk assessment approaches are being used in correctional agencies.

Read More



 


Reentry Matters: Strategies and Successes of Second Chance Act Grantees Across the United States

With over 95 percent of people in the nation's state prisons expected to be released at some point, officials at all levels of government recognize the need forinitiatives to support the successful reentry of these individuals to their communities. For the estimated 60,000 youth incarcerated in juvenile detention and correctional facilities on any given day, there is a particular urgency to help them avoid crime and improve their prospects for a successful future when released.

In 2008, Congress responded to these needs by passing the Second Chance Act, first-of-its-kind legislation that was enacted with bipartisan support and backed by a broad spectrum of leaders in law enforcement, corrections, courts, behavioral health, and other areas. The legislation authorizes federal grants that support reentry programs for adults and juveniles, nearly 600 of which have been awarded to government agencies and nonprofit organizations in 49 states by the U.S. Department of Justice's Office of Justice Programs.

 

The program snapshots below illustrate the positive impact these reentry initiatives can have by focusing on areas vital to reintegration back into the community, including employment, education, mentoring, and substance abuse and mental health treatment. Also highlighted are programs that address the needs of a particular population, such as youth, women, and tribal communities. Representing a wide range of populations served, these programs also demonstrate the diversity of approaches that can address recidivism and increase public safety.

Read the full document

 

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